marginalia

cold green tea press / notebook / photography

Sep 22

The insomnia of Emil Cioran

Do you suffer it still?

A lot less.  But that was a precise period, about six or seven years, where my whole perspective on the world changed.  I think it’s a very important problem.  It happens like this:  normally someone who goes to bed and sleeps all night, the next day he begins a new life almost.  It’s not simply another day, it’s another life.  And so, he can undertake things, he can express himself, he has a present, a future, and so on.  But for someone who doesn’t sleep, from the time of going to bed at night to waking up in the morning it’s all continuous, there’s no interruption.  Which means, there is no suppression of consciousness.  It all turns around that.  So, instead of starting a new life, at eight in the morning you’re like you were at eight the evening before.  The nightmare continues uninterrupted in a way, and in the morning, start what?  Since there’s no difference from the night before. That new life doesn’t exist.  The whole day is a trial, it’s the continuity of the trial.  While everyone rushes toward the future, you are outside.  So, when that’s stretched out for months and years, it causes the sense of things, the conception of life, to be forcibly changed.  You don’t see what future to look forward to, because you don’t have any future.  And I really consider that the most terrible, most unsettling, in short the principal experience of my life.  There’s also the fact that you are alone with yourself.  In the middle of the night, everyone’s asleep, you are the only one who is awake.  Right away I’m not a part of mankind, I live in another world.  And it requires an extraordinary will to not succumb.

—From an interview with Emil Cioran at Itineraries of a Hummingbird (via Biblioklept)


Sep 5
René Magritte: L’acte de foie, 1960

René Magritte: L’acte de foie, 1960

(via whenyouwereapostcard)


Aug 8

Jun 30
“When I’m cleaning up the studio, which I do quite often—and it’s quite a big studio—I just have it playing on random shuffle. And so, suddenly, I hear something and often I can’t even remember doing it. Or I have a very vague memory of it, because a lot of these pieces, they’re just something I started at half past eight one evening and then finished at quarter past ten, gave some kind of funny name to that doesn’t describe anything, and then completely forgot about, and then, years later, on the random shuffle, this thing comes up, and I think, Wow, I didn’t hear it when I was doing it. And I think that often happens—we don’t actually hear what we’re doing… . I often find pieces and I think, This is genius. Which me did that? Who was the me that did that?” Brian Eno

Jun 14

wellnotwisely:

Old Canon advertisements, with art by Katsuhiro Otomo

Camera Life: Katsuhiro Otomo

(via jesuisperdu)


Jun 5
“Real film is light, digital is electricity.” Aki Kaurismäki

I like things that are handmade and I like to see people’s hand in the world, anywhere in the world; it doesn’t matter to me where it is.  And in my own work, I do everything by hand.  I don’t project or use anything mechanical, because even though I do spend a lot of time trying to perfect my line work and my hand, my hand will always be imperfect because I’m human.  And I think it’s the part that’s off that’s interesting, that even if I’m doing really big letters and I spend a lot of time going over the line and over the line and trying to make it straight, I’ll never be able to make it straight.  From a distance it might look straight, but when you get close up, you can always see the line waver.  And that’s where the beauty is.
—Margaret Kilgallen, from Excerpts from an Interview with Margaret Kilgallen for Art:21

I like things that are handmade and I like to see people’s hand in the world, anywhere in the world; it doesn’t matter to me where it is.  And in my own work, I do everything by hand.  I don’t project or use anything mechanical, because even though I do spend a lot of time trying to perfect my line work and my hand, my hand will always be imperfect because I’m human.  And I think it’s the part that’s off that’s interesting, that even if I’m doing really big letters and I spend a lot of time going over the line and over the line and trying to make it straight, I’ll never be able to make it straight.  From a distance it might look straight, but when you get close up, you can always see the line waver.  And that’s where the beauty is.

—Margaret Kilgallen, from Excerpts from an Interview with Margaret Kilgallen for Art:21


Jun 4
Hers was not a centrist’s nostalgia, a longing for a perfect past.  Rather, she craved the texture of decline, to linger in the last breaths of endangered but determined forms of expression.—Eungie Joo on Margaret Kilgallen, from Margaret Kilgallen: In the Sweet Bye & Bye


Hers was not a centrist’s nostalgia, a longing for a perfect past.  Rather, she craved the texture of decline, to linger in the last breaths of endangered but determined forms of expression.

—Eungie Joo on Margaret Kilgallen, from Margaret Kilgallen: In the Sweet Bye & Bye


May 27

Late Spring (Yasujiro Ozu, 1949)

(via jesuisperdu)


Mar 13
“A word is not the same with one writer as with another. One tears it from his guts. The other pulls it out of his overcoat pocket.” Charles Péguy

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